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  1. Introduction to Oral History for Writers
    Led by Svetlana Kitto

    Date: Sunday, October 29

    Time: 2-5pm (3 hours)
    Cost: $100
    Capacity: 12 participants 
    Registration deadline: October 25
    Register here.


    Oral history is an interdisciplinary tool that has the power to bring more complexity, multivocality and urgency to writing of any genre. For writers interested in documenting unheard voices, undertold stories, or generally enlivening their work with the historical phenomenon of everyday speech, this workshop will introduce oral history interviewing techniques as both a theoretical and practical mode of writing about the world. Students will practice interviewing and writing using oral history methods, as well as read texts from a variety of periods and perspectives to get them thinking about their own complex points-of-view in this historical moment.

    Svetlana Kitto is a writer and oral historian in New York City. Her fiction, journalism and essays have appeared or are forthcoming in Salon, VICE, the New York Observer, the Huffington Post, ART21, BOMB, Buzzfeed and the book Occupy (Verso, 2012) among other publications and anthologies. She has contributed interviews to oral history projects with the Museum of Arts and Design, the Mashantucket Pequot Museum, and the Brooklyn Historical Society, where she developed and taught a writing workshop called Racial Realities: Writing About Race in the First Person. Additionally, she has taught or lectured at Columbia University, Pratt Institute, and Rutgers University - Newark. She co-curates the reading and performance series Adult Contemporary, which will be releasing its first book in the fall. In early 2017, her oral history for the book Ken Tisa: Objects/Time/Offerings, published by Gordon Robichaux and Pre-Echo Press, was called a "genius catalog" by Holland Cotter of the New York Times. 

  2. Image Speak
    Led by Rachel James and Georgia Wall
    In collaboration with The School of Making Thinking 

    Dates: October 16-December (8 weeks)
    Time: Mondays, 7-9pm
    Cost: $25 per session ($200 total)
    Capacity: 15 participants

    Sign up here.

    Image Speak delves into the world of video art, specifically works with little hierarchical delineation between text and the moving image. In addition to making video essays, we will discuss texts that address the theoretical underpinnings of the medium and screen seminal and experimental works in the field. Examples include videos by Moyra Davey, Ismail Bahri, Anicka Yi, Trinh T minh ha, and Chris Marker. The course will culminate in a public showcase of student work at Spectacle Theater in Brooklyn.  

    Does the moving image become an illustration of text, or is text created in response to footage? What does a process look like in which the text and image is being developed simultaneously? Exploring these processes together, the eight weeks will include many experimentations in writing and image making. Students will be asked to self-generate material as well as respond using the video essay form. Each participant will have the opportunity for group critique. By the end of Image Speak students will have produced at least one video essay for public screening at Spectacle Theater and a series of written, video, and response pieces as potential material to develop in the future. 

    Participants will ideally have access to:

    • a computer with video editing software (iMovie or another free video editing software)
    • a device to record footage (smartphone or camera)

    If you would like to sign up for this course yet access to equipment is prohibitive, please contact The School of Making Thinking as limited equipment is available. 



    Rachel James is an artist and poet with a background in cultural anthropology and experimental ethnography. She has exhibited or performed throughout the United States, Canada and Europe, including at Essex Flowers, La MaMa, Situations, Spectacle, and Recess in New York City, The New Gallery in Calgary, Totaldobze, in Riga, and Kamppi Chapel in Helsinki. She is an MFA Candidate at Bard College’s Milton Avery Graduate School for the Arts and curates exhibitions and performance events in Mexico City and New York, where she lives and works.

    Georgia Wall is an artist based in New York. Wall’s videos have been exhibited at Team Gallery, Document Space, Faena Art Center, Anthology Film Archives, Spectacle Theater and Flux Factory. In New York she has presented her performance work at New York Live Arts, HERE, US Blues, Dixon Place, Movement Research at Judson Church, Ortega y Gasset Projects and CATCH at The Invisible Dog. Her work has been written about in publications including, ART-News, Mousse Magazine Online, The New Yorker, Hemispheric Institute E-Misférica and Time Out Chicago. Wall also has a curatorial practice and is part of Bottom which has organized events at Abrons Art Center, Spectacle Theater, Glasshouse Projects and Essex Flowers. Wall holds an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. 

  3. Introduction to Oral History for Writers
    Led by Svetlana Kitto

    Date: Sunday, August 13th

    Time: 3-6pm (3 hours)
    Cost: $100
    Capacity: 12 participants 
    Registration deadline: August 10
    Register here.


    Oral history is an interdisciplinary tool that has the power to bring more complexity, multivocality and urgency to writing of any genre. For writers interested in documenting unheard voices, undertold stories, or generally enlivening their work with the historical phenomenon of everyday speech, this workshop will introduce oral history interviewing techniques as both a theoretical and practical mode of writing about the world. Students will practice interviewing and writing using oral history methods, as well as read texts from a variety of periods and perspectives to get them thinking about their own complex points-of-view in this historical moment.

    Svetlana Kitto is a writer and oral historian in New York City. Her fiction, journalism and essays have appeared or are forthcoming in Salon, VICE, the New York Observer, the Huffington Post, ART21, BOMB, Buzzfeed and the book Occupy (Verso, 2012) among other publications and anthologies. She has contributed interviews to oral history projects with the Museum of Arts and Design, the Mashantucket Pequot Museum, and the Brooklyn Historical Society, where she developed and taught a writing workshop called Racial Realities: Writing About Race in the First Person. Additionally, she has taught or lectured at Columbia University, Pratt Institute, and Rutgers University - Newark. She co-curates the reading and performance series Adult Contemporary, which will be releasing its first book in the fall. In early 2017, her oral history for the book Ken Tisa: Objects/Time/Offerings, published by Gordon Robichaux and Pre-Echo Press, was called a "genius catalog" by Holland Cotter of the New York Times. 

  4. All Inseparable Now
    A Workshop led by Sara Jane Stoner

    Dates: July 10-August 14 (6 weeks)
    Time: Mondays, 7-9:30pm
    Capacity: 20 participants 
    Cost: $25-50 per session ($150-300 total)
    Registration deadline: July 1
    Sign up here.

    Urgently, with the belief that poetic practices have the power to inform and transform all kinds of life practices, this workshop will seek to actively and collectively identify and write through/toward some of the lessons delivered in recent poetic work by living poets about the inseparability of politics and aesthetics in language (and beyond). I propose this workshop out of the desire to create a space in which we individually and collectively identify ways to acknowledge the affective, intellectual, and cultural labor of these writers, and develop and practice forms of listening, attentiveness, and reflective consciousness in reading which will foster critical modes of response in discussion, in writing, and in life that speak to what these poets honor, question, trouble, represent, and demand. 

    To ask: what are poems doing in the world right now? (what powers do they speak to, what powers do they name, refuse, and wield?); what conditions and forms of consciousness do recent poems represent and raise through what they’re doing with form, sound, and language? For me, these questions foreground a need for individuals, and this workshop, to practice an awareness of the ethics of readership: i.e. what a reader brings to texts in terms of their desires, assumptions, identity and background, access to forms of capital and privilege, “literary” and social contexts, prior knowledge and experience. To this complex end, this workshop intends to embrace all kinds of poetic energies in reading, writing, and discussion—spiritual and material, sharp and gentle, formative and destructive, centering and decentering, choral and particular, structural and post-structural, affirmative and negative, personal and theoretical, in ambivalence, in alignment, and in conflict—with the hopes that the implied and constructed values of some of these binaries reveal themselves, merge, collapse, and/or re-form, and that we might better account for ourselves as readers and writers.

    Meetings may be structured around the following ideas, all of which bear different inflections as they are relevant to particular poets: word as action; poetic simultaneity; elemental lyric identity; boundaries, borders, and protectionism; un-/non-sovereign subjects; poethics of care; the big NO; poems as acts of re-creation, re-imagination, and/or refiguring of readers, audiences, and/or populations; pleasure, play, and punishment; how to speak to violence and/or how to refuse to speak to violence; voicing singular collectives; bodying the neoliberal bureaucracy; (not) fucking with institutions; figuring the ongoing colonial project and the poetics of decolonization; the anthropocene, the capitalocene, the NO-cene; endings and infinities; protest and eventness; movement and Movement; “random” acts of revolutionary being; the stakes (problems/possibilities) of (il)legibility and (in)coherence. Working list of poets/writers to be read and responded to: Ari Banias, Hannah Black, Daniel Borzutzky, Chia-Lun Chang, CA Conrad, Natalie Diaz, Joshua Jennifer Espinoza, Adjua Gargi Nzinga Greaves, Alexis Pauline Gumbs, Marwa Helal, Terrence Hayes, Rickey Laurentiis, Layli Longsoldier, Dawn Lundy Martin, Lara Mimosa Montes, Fred Moten, Hoa Nguyen, Morgan Parker, Tommy Pico, Nina Puro, Claudia Rankine, Raquel Salas Rivera, Solmaz Sharif, Danez Smith, Oki Sogumi, Christopher Soto, TC Tolbert, Wendy Trevino, Alli Warren, Laurie Weeks, Maged Zaher.



    Sara Jane Stoner is a PhD Candidate in English at CUNY Graduate Center, who holds an MFA from Indiana University and a BA from Smith College, and is currently working on a dissertation focused on critical pedagogies and queer theory, particularly in the context of contemporary experimental writing. She has taught or currently teaches at Brooklyn College, Baruch College, and Cooper Union, where she worked in the writing center for almost a decade. Her first book, Experience in the Medium of Destruction (Portable Press @ YoYo Labs, 2015) was nominated for a Lambda Literary Award. Her reviews and criticism can be found or are forthcoming in the Poetry Project Newsletter, Sinister Wisdom, Brooklyn Rail, and The Fanzine. A chapbook of poems titled Grief Hour was published in the Spring 2017 issue of Black Warrior Review.

    This event is funded in part by Poets & Writers with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

     

  5. Cave Small Cave Big Screening and Children's Screenwriting Workshop
    April 8-9, 2017

    Screening
    Saturday, April 8, 4-6pm

    Join us for the American premiere of the film Cave Small Cave Big at Wendy’s Subway on Saturday, April 8th with the director, Toronto-based artist Joële Walinga. Doors will open at 4pm with an introduction, screening (11 mins) and Q&A, followed by a reception.

    Cave Small Cave Big is the first in a series of short films written by children and directed by artist Joële Walinga. In this story by 5-year-olds Madeline Harker and Adelaide Schwartz, we follow a Butterfly Girl's journey through inspiration and loss, and veer away to follow the lost object itself. The film jumps from character to character as they cope with the transience of ownership. Cave Small Cave Big had its grand premiere at the Art Gallery of Ontario in February 2017, followed by a Halifax screening in March. The film will be presented in New Mexico, Chicago and Los Angeles in the spring.

    Watch a trailer here.

    Screenwriting Workshop
    Sunday, April 8, 10am-5pm
    Capacity: 8 children
    Ages: 5-7 years old
    Free, register here.

    Cave Small Cave Big 
    Workshop is a screenwriting workshop for kids aged 5-7, where we explore how storytelling can grow from the page to the screen. During this workshop, children will work collaboratively to write the kind of movie that they would like to see on the big screen. Visual artist and filmmaker Joële Walinga will adapt each script from the Cave Small Cave Big Workshop into functioning screenplays, and apply for funding to turn them into professional live-action films.

    Please sign up here or contact us at info@wendyssubway.com if you would like to register your child for the workshop or if you require further information. The workshop runs 10am-5pm on Sunday, April 9, 2017, can hold a maximum of 8 children ages 5-7 and is completely free to register. It takes place at Wendy’s Subway and will be facilitated by Joële Walinga and Daniel Warth, both of whom are experienced filmmakers. Walinga and Warth are also experienced with childcare, have criminal background, and vulnerable sector and child abuse register checks. We will prioritize workshop participation from children who come from low income and immigrant/refugee households. Snacks for throughout the day and lunch will be provided by Wendy’s Subway. Please specify your child's dietary restrictions and preferences so that we can accommodate.

    Joële Walinga is a Toronto-based artist whose work shuffles the roles of art-maker and art-viewer, using community collaboration to explore the visual world of the public. Her goal is to stimulate inclusive dialogues in contemporary art-making and receivership. Her work has been shown at The Art Gallery of Ontario, The Khyber Centre for the Arts, Narwhal Contemporary, Xpace Cultural Centre and The Roundtable Residency, and has been featured in Canadian Art, CBC Arts, Art Matters and Daily VICE.

    Since studying film at Sheridan College, Daniel Warth has worked on over forty short films as writer, director, editor, actor, producer and/or composer. His film work has screened at festivals across North America, including Worldwide Short Film Festival, Rhode Island International Film Festival, and, most recently, Slamdance Film Festival, where his first feature, "Dim the Fluorescents", won the Grand Jury Award for Best Narrative Feature.


    www.joelewalinga.com
    www.cavesmallcavebig.com
    www.nightmarehere.com


    Press:
    Daily Vice
    Art Matters
    CBC Arts
    Canadian Art



  6. Drawing for Poets, Writing for Painters
    A workshop with Nicole Eisenman and erica kaufman 
    Friday, October 14, 7-9pm

    Registration fee (sliding scale): $50-100
    Capacity: 15 participants
    Register here.

    Revolution is in the air! Unfetter yourself from the restrictive manacles of left-brain thinking as we draw from life. Frolic in the halcyon glades of the right brain imagination. This two-hour class involves drawing from life with some guidance and some lexical interventions, writerly interruptions. We will explore the fundamentals of figurative drawing: gesture, line, proportion, and shadow. We will also introduce language into figure: word as gesture, line as limb, punctuation as proportion, shadow as shadow. No experience necessary. You may leave this class with a migraine or an epic.

    This workshop is organized as a fundraiser for Wendy's Subway.  The registration fee is determined on a sliding scale by the participant; all fees are donated to Wendy's Subway. 

    Nicole Eisenman is an artist living and working in Brooklyn. Her work has been exhibited widely, both in the United States and internationally. Recent one-artist exhibitions have been held at the New Museum, NY (2016); the Institute of Contemporary Art and at the Institute for Contemporary Art, PA (2014). She is currently in the group shows Painting 2.0 at the Museum Brandhorst, Munich,  The Montreal Biannual, and These Strangers... Painting and People, S.M.A.K., Ghent.

    erica kaufman is the author of INSTANT CLASSIC (Roof Books, 2013) and censory impulse (Factory School, 2009). she is also the co-editor of NO GENDER: Reflections on the Life and Work of kari edwards (Venn Diagram, 2009), and of Adrienne Rich: Teaching at CUNY, 1968-1974 (Lost & Found: The CUNY Poetics Document Initiative, 2014) . Prose and critical work can be found in: Rain Taxi, The Poetry Project Newsletter, Jacket2, Open Space/SFMOMA Blog and in The Color of Vowels: New York School Collaborations (ed. Mark Silverberg, Palgrave MacMillan, 2013). Additional critical work is forthcoming in  Despite the Possible: 15 American Women Poets (ed. Mary Biddinger, University of Akron Press, 2015) and in the MLA Guide to Teaching Gertrude Stein (eds. L. Esdale and D. Mix). kaufman is the Director of Faculty and Curriculum for the Institute for Writing & Thinking at Bard College, and teaches in both the Master of Arts in Teaching and First Year Seminar Programs.

    Image: Nicole Eisenman, woodblock print, 2012. 

  7. Spring-Summer Writing Seminar
    "Postcolonialims" Reading & Discussion Group

    April 22 - August 26, 2016 

    Meets biweekly, alternating Fridays, 7-8:30pm 
    Facilitated by Kevin Antranik Cassem and Adjua Gargi Nzinga Greaves
    Register by April 18 by contacting info@wendyssubway.com
    Limited to 12 participants 

    This seminar aims to immerse its participants in postcolonial inquiry through written engagement with an ambitious reading list and biweekly meetings offering support and critical reflection.

    ● Participants begin this 20-week seminar by meeting to share with the group a central question they will ask of the 10 texts we will engage over the course of the spring and summer.

    ● Participants will then read contemporary works of postcolonial inquiry and — from this intake  monthly generate their own 500 to 800 word responses to the reading in a shared Google Document.

    ● Participants will meet twice in a month on alternate Fridays: first to discuss the reading and then again, two weeks later, to engage a critique of one another’s written responses.

    ● Two titles will serve as channels for additional consideration alongside the monthly readings:

    ○ Eduardo Galeano. (Cedric Belfrage, trans.)  Memory of Fire. Trilogy.

    ○ Edouard Glissant. (Betsy Wing, trans.)  Poetics of Relation.


    Image caption: Wangechi Mutu, "Le Noble Savage," 2007, ink and collage on Mylar

  8. Letterpress Workshop
    Led by Emily Toder
    Sunday, March 20, 2016: 1-2:30pm 
    Cost: $10 (free for members)

    Registration deadline: Thursday, March 17, 2016
    To register: email info@wendyssubway.com with subject line: "Letterpress" 


    In this workshop, participants will receive a basic introduction to letterpress printing. Learn how to set type, ink up the press, print and proof pages, and, of course, clean up!! The workshop will be fun, informal and eminently hands-on, so that everyone gets a chance to do everything, ask as many questions as they like, and leave with enough familiarity to come back and use the press independently and at their leisure for special projects.

    Emily Toder is a poet, translator, archivist, and printer. She is the author of the poetry collections Beachy Headand Science, from Coconut Books, and the translator of various prose and poetry collections, among them The Errant Astrologers, by Felipe Benítez Reyes (Ugly Duckling Presse). A graduate of the MFA Program for Poets and Writers at the University of Massachusetts, she also holds degrees in Literary Translation and Archives Management, and currently works as registrar and librarian at an art consultancy in Long Island City. In 2008 she founded Nor By Press, a tiny publishing outfit producing chapbooks, broadsides, and special ephemera on a Kelsey tabletop press.

  9. Artists' Books: Book-Binding Workshop
    Led by Chang Yuchen
    Sunday, March 20, 2016: 3-6pm
    Cost: $35 (includes tool kit) 

    Registration deadline: Thursday, March 17, 2016

    To register: email info@wendyssubway.com with subject line: "Artists' Book"

    Program:

    -Brief overview of the history of artists' books in modern and contemporary art
    -Basic knowledge of paper and tools
    -3 ways to make a book out of a single sheet of paper (useful for posters or fliers)
    -Pamphlet stitching (3 holes)
    -Long stitch

    Chang Yuchen (b.1989, China) graduated from Central Academy of Fine Arts, Beijing (BFA) in 2011 and School of the Art Institute of Chicago (MFA) in 2013. She currently lives and works in New York. Solo exhibitions include Chang Yuchen: Barbaric Poetry at Between Art Lab, Beijing (2015) and Chang Yuchen: Snake and Othersat Fou Gallery, New York (2013). Group exhibitions include: 29th Kyoto Art Festival, Kyoto Municipal Museum of Art (2015), Intaglio, the Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts, New York (2015), North American Print Biennial at Boston University (2013), Superstition at San Francisco Center for Books (2013), Gwangju Biennale 2011 at Gwangju Kunsthalle, Martell Focus on Talents Project at Today Art Museum, Beijing(2011). Her works are collected by Museum of Modern Art library, New York; Joan Flasch Artists’ Book Collection, Chicago.changyuchen.com

  10. Let's Get Better at This: A Writing Circle for Journalists
    Workshop led by Max Pearl

    Schedule: Tuesdays, bi-weekly, for twelve weeks
    Start date: July 14-September 23

    This workshop will bring together a group of working journalists so that we can share pitches, workshop each others' stories, and pool knowledge and resources collectively among our peers. It will emphasize reported and investigative work over analytical writing ("thinkpieces"), and offer writers an opportunity to explore a more literary style that might otherwise not fit within the language of web writing. Participants will bring stories in progress to be workshopped with the group; we will all complete an assignment or two; we will probably have a guest speaker and read assigned materials together. At the end, authors can submit their workshopped articles for a printed collection.

    Applicants must submit a recent piece of reporting or non-fiction by June 15th to be considered for the writing circle, which will be limited to eight members. Radio journalists and podcasters are also eligible to participate; please send a transcript or audio file. We'll meet every other week for twelve weeks, and figure out which day of the week and time is best once we have all the applicants chosen. 

    The workshop is facilitated by Max Pearl, an independent journalist, editor and documentarian. He founded the quarterly magazine Cluster Mag and his features have appeared in VICESalonThe Fader and The New Inquiry
  11. Artists' Books: Book-Binding Workshop
    Led by Yuchen Chang 
    Sunday, July 19, 1:30-4:30pm
    Cost: $20 (includes tool kit) 

    Register by July 12th by emailing info@wendyssubway.com with headline "Artists' Books" 

    Program: 
    -Brief overview of the history of artists' books in modern and contemporary art
    -Basic knowledge of paper and tools
    -3 ways to make a book out of a single sheet of paper (useful for posters or fliers)
    -Pamphlet stitching (3 holes)
    -Long stitch

    Chang Yuchen (b.1989, China) graduated from Central Academy of Fine Arts, Beijing (BFA) in 2011
    and School of the Art Institute of Chicago (MFA) in 2013. She currently lives and works in New York. Chang Yuchen works with a wide range of media: printmaking, artists’ book, video, sound performance and among others. Her recent shows include Chang Yuchen: Snake and Others at Fou
    Gallery, New York (2013), Boston Printmakers 2013 North American Print Biennial at Boston University College of Fine Arts, Superstition at San Francisco Center for Books, Gwangju Biennale 2011 at Gwangju Kunsthalle, Martell Focus on Talents Finalists Exhibition (2011) at Today Art Museum and A Decade Long Exposure at Central Academy of Fine Arts and Contemporary Chinese Photography (2010). Her work is collected by Museum of Modern Art Library, New York and Joan Flasch Artists’ Book Collection, Chicago. 

  12. READING POETS BY THE SUN SIGN
    Workshop led by Filip Marinovich


    Class size: up to 12
    Dates: Begins March 12-end date TBA
    Schedule: Thursdays, 7-9pm, Weekly 

    Registration deadline: March 1st. Email info@wendyssubway.com with subject line: "Reading Poets by the Sun Sign"

    *

    This ongoing workshop, which started in February 2013 at the Poetry Project, concerns itself with the question of time in poetry, namely, what it is. How do we feel it season to season, day to day, minute to minute. What archetypes arise in each sign that we can inquire into through poetry. An operating theater where archetypes are on the table. We end up operating on ourselves. Trance the only anesthetic. Breath the awakener. In Pisces we read Kerouac's "Mexico City Blues" and write to the blasts of Ornette Coleman and Lou Reed. The trident as guitar in the water. Pisces rules the feet so we will dance with the feet of poetry, the ICTI. Dreamwork encouraged. We will read texts together aloud and allow whatever rises to the top in our discussion to become the focus of our writing, or the starting point for adventure. 

    *

    Filip Marinovich est l'auteur de "WOLFMAN LIBRARIAN" now available at Ugly Duckling Presse. 

  13. THE FLOWER AND THE TANK: DOCUMENTARY POETICS
    Workshop led by Wendy Xu


    Class size: 5-8 students
    Dates: February 21-March 21
    Time: Saturdays, 2-5pm, Weekly

    Register at Brooklyn Poets here. Registration is $295. 
    Registration deadline: Sunday, February 15. Earlybird discount $20 off by Sunday, February 1.

    *

    Poetry bears witness to history. The poet Liu Xiaobo wrote in response to the 1989 Tian’anmen Square protests of existing “between the flower and the tank,” a sentiment we will take up in this workshop as emblematic of the collision between first-person experience and overwhelming political reality. In these five weeks we will explore the generative possibilities of using poetry to document a historical moment and/or self, a personal psychology/pathology, a process of thinking acted upon by the forces of time—most likely where all of these things intersect. Taking a second cue from Lyn Hejinian’s idea of the “open text,” one in which “all the elements of the work are maximally excited,” students will experiment with and borrow from the language of mainstream documentation and use it to a different end. How can poetry speak on (and against) the contemporary moment with a different mouth than corporate reportage? Where do the myriad concerns of a modern first-person self merge with journalistic intention? Students will situate themselves as poet, archivist, historian, narrator and critic. Texts will be considered by Lucy Ives, Anna Moschovakis, Liu Xiaobo, Claudia Rankine, Lyn Hejinian, Aaron Kunin, Danez Smith, Myung Mi Kim and various others.

    *

    Wendy Xu is the author of You Are Not Dead (Cleveland State University Poetry Center, 2013) and several chapbooks. Selected by D.A. Powell for the 2011 Patricia Goedicke Prize in Poetry, her recent work has appeared in Best American Poetry, Poetry, Denver Quarterly, Gulf Coast, Guernica, Black Warrior Review, Hyperallergic, The Voltaand elsewhere. She was awarded a Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Fellowship by the Poetry Foundation in 2014. She lives in Bushwick and teaches writing at CUNY.

  14. **

    TWITTER AND TYPEWRITERS: WRITING IN A HYPERCONNECTED WORLD
    Workshop led by Melissa McDaniel

    Class size: up to 12
    Dates: February 23-March 30
    Time: Mondays, 7-9:30pm, Weekly

    Registration deadline: February 16th. Email info@wendyssubway.com with subject line "Twitter and Typewriters"

    *

    We are now living in a postdigital world, where the question of whether to adapt to or disregard technology is no longer relevant. Instead, we are faced with a different predicament: what is our role in this world as writers? The internet has revolutionized the way we absorb and create content, and literature is facing a major transition.

    In this 6 week workshop, we will consider how digital technology has helped or hindered our ability to create and experience what we call literature. As writers, we will examine how we can respond to this brave new world of digital technology, focusing on literature’s power to transform. In our quest for answers, we will read and discuss internet poetry, scientific findings, experimental prose, social commentary, and student work. Each class will be divided between discussions and workshops. Throughout this course, participants will have several opportunities to submit work for group critique. In addition to readings and workshops, we will also complete digital writing exercises (including writing a collaborative piece in a Google Doc) and conclude with a public reading at Wendy’s Subway (date TBA).

    *

    Melissa McDaniel is a southern transplant currently living in Bedford-Stuyvesant. She is a staff editor at theNewerYork Press, and her work has been published in Be About It PressLuna Station QuarterlyLiars’ League NYCWendy’s Is, and elsewhere. She is fond of both Twitter and typewriters. 


  15. Deconstruct | Reconstruct: Critiquing the MFA
    Led by Adjua Greaves

    Dates: October 28 - December 16, 2014
    Schedule: Weekly, Tuesdays 7-9pm

    Deconstruct | Reconstruct — Critiquing the MFA is a reading-and-discussion group culminating in a symposium on the topic of extra-institutional higher education. The program evolves out of facilitator Adjua Greaves’ durational performance, unschoolMFA, in which she works to identify the constitutive elements of higher education in the visual and performing arts in order to develop a rigorous, self-directed, program of study. 

    The first of the eight weekly workshops will be an opportunity for participants and the facilitator to co-curate the texts to be engaged during the first half of the meetings. During the second half of the workshop, participants will begin to specialize in topics related to extra-institutional higher education in order to develop a response project to present at a symposium in early 2015. Greaves will be available in the weeks leading up to the symposium to give feedback to those presenting. 

    This 8-week workshop will begin on Tuesday, October 28th at 7 PM. Participants are encouraged to review the facilitator’s proposed syllabus and to arrive at the first meeting prepared to engage as suggested. We will be gathering in the enclosed meeting room. Meeting-room doors open at 6:30 PM, and discussion will begin promptly at 7 PM. 

    We look forward to your contributions to Deconstruct | Reconstruct — Critiquing the MFA.


    CALENDAR AND SYLLABUS


    October 28

    INTRODUCTIONS

    • Facilitator, Adjua Greaves—uMFA_1, gives brief overview of history of unschoolMFA and her intent in collaborating with Wendy’s Subway to host Deconstruct | Reconstruct — Critiquing the MFA
    • Participants share their educational histories, current creative practices and interests, and the questions and concerns that lead them to join this reading-and-discussion group.
    • Participants review reading list provided by facilitator, contribute additional material, consider the logistics of collective/individual coverage of reading material and decide on workshop pace.
    • Participants identify through-line questions for these discussions.


    November 4

    LEARNING AND EDUCATION

    Education — Primer” (Whitechapel: Documents of Contemporary Art) (Allen [ed], 2011), Experience and Education (Dewey, 1938)Pedagogy of the Oppressed, (Freire, 1970), Education Automation: Comprehensive Learning for Emergent Humanity (Fuller, 1962),Anarchist Pedagogies: Collective Actions, Theories, and Critical Reflections on Education (Haworth [ed], 2012), The Undercommons: Fugitive Learning and Black Study, (Harney & Moten, 2013), Teaching to Transgress: Education as the practice of Freedom (hooks, 1994)Lapham’s Quarterly: Ways of Learning (Lapham [ed], 2008), The Teenage Liberation Handbook: How to Quit School and Get a Real Life and Education (Llewellyn, 1998),  Cabinet Magazine: Learning (Najafi, 2010).


    November 11

    ART SCHOOL

    Education (Whitechapel: Documents of Contemporary Art) (Allen [ed], 2011), Rethinking the Contemporary Art School (Buckley, 2010), Institutional Time: A Critique of Studio Art Education (Chicago, 2014)Artists with PhDs: On the New Doctoral Degree in Studio Art (Elkins [ed], 2014), Black Mountain College (Katz, 2013), Art School (Propositions for the 21st Century) (Madoff [ed], 2009)Draw It With Your Eyes Closed: The Art of the Assignment (Paper Monument, 2012), Seven Days in the Art World — “The Crit” (Thornton, 2008), 101 Things to Learn in Art School (White, 2011), 


    November 18

    WRITING PROGRAMS

    Professing Literature: An Institutional History (Graff, 2007), MFA vs NYC: Two Cultures of American Fiction (Harbach [ed], 2014)The Program Era: Postwar Fiction and The Rise of Creative Writing (McGurl, 2008), The Elephants Teach: Creative Writing Since 1880 (Myers, 2006), 

    November 25

    INSTITUTIONAL CRITIQUE 

    Institutions by Artists (Khonsary & Podesva [eds], 2012), Should I Go to Grad School?: 41 Answers to an Impossible Question (Loudis, et al [eds], 2014)Without Their Permission: How the 21st Century Will be Made Not Managed (Ohanian, 2013), The New Administration of a Fine Arts Education (Voorhies, 2011)

    December 2

    PARTICIPANT SPECIALIZATION

    December 9

    PARTICIPANT SPECIALIZATION

    December 16

    PARTICIPANT SPECIALIZATION

    January 6

    PRESENTATION FEEDBACK

    January 13

    PRESENTATION FEEDBACK

    January 20

    PRESENTATION FEEDBACK

    TBA

    S Y M P O S I U M


    COMPREHENSIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY


    Allen, Felicity, editor. Education. Documents of Contemporary Art, edited by Iwona Blazwick. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press, 2011.

    Aurobindo, Sri. The National Value of Art. 1910.

    Chicago, Judy. Institutional Time: A Critique of Studio Art Education. The Monacelli Press, 2014.

    Dewey, John. Experience & Education.  New York: Touchstone, 1938.

    Florida, Richard. The Rise of the Creative Class: And How It’s Transforming Work, Leisure, Community and Everyday Life. New York: Basic Books, 2002.

    Fuller, R. Buckminster. Education Automation. Comprehensive Learning for Emergent Humanity, edited by Jaime Snyder. Baden, Switzerland: Lars Müller Publishers, 2010.

    Graff, Gerald. Professing Literature: An Institutional History, Twentieth Anniversary Edition. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2007.

    Harbach, Chad, editor. MFA VS NYC: The Two Cultures of American Fiction. New York: n+1 & Faber and Faber, 2014.

    Haworth, Robert H., editor. Anarchist Pedagogies: Collective Actions, Theories, and Critical Reflections on Education. Oakland, California: PM Press, 2012.

    Katz, Vincent, editor. Black Mountain College: Experiment in Art. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press, 2013.

    Khonsary, Jeff and Kristina Lee Podesva, eds. Institutions by Artists: Volume One. Filip Folio Series: C. Vancouver, British Columbia: Fillip Editions & the Pacific Association of Artist Run Centers, 2012.

    Lapham, Lewis H., editor. Ways of Learning. Lapham’s Quarterly. Volume 1, Number 4. New York: American Agora Foundation, Fall 2008.

    Llewellyn, Grace. The Teenage Liberation Handbook: How to quit school and get a real life and education. Revised edition. Eugene, Oregon: Lowry House, 1998.

    Jessica Loudis (et al), editors. Should I Go to Grad School: 41 Answers to an Impossible Question. TKTKTKTK: Bloomsbury, 2014.

    Madoff, Steven Henry, editor. Art School: (propositions for the 21st century). Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press, 2009.

    McGurl, Marc. The Program Era: Postwar Fiction and Rise of Creative Writing. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 2009.

    Myers, David Gershom. The Elephants Teach: Creative Writing Since 1880. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2006.

    Najafi, Sina, ed. Learning. Cabinet: A Quarterly of Art and Culture. Issue 39. New York: Immaterial Incorporated, Fall 2010.

    O’Hanian, Alexis. Without Their Permission: How the 21st Century will be made, not managed.  New York: Business Plus, 2013.

    Petrovich, Dushko and Roger White. Draw it with your eyes closed: the art of the art assignment. n+1 Foundation: Brooklyn, New York, 2012.

    Thornton, Sarah. “The Crit.” Seven Days in the Art World. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2008.

    Voorhies, James and Lisa Dent, curators. The New Administration of a Fine Arts Education. Bureau for Open Culture & Columbus College of Art and Design, 2011.

    White, Kit. 101 Things to Learn in Art School. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press, 2011.

     

  16. READING POETS BY SUN SIGN: WHITMAN THE GEMINI 
    Workshop led by Filip Marinovich
    June 2014: Wednesdays, 7-9pm

    Free and open to all: sign up by emailing wendys.subway@gmail.com

    Like the song says: I LIKE WHITMAN IN JUNE! / HOW ABOUT YOU? / I LIKE A WHITMAN TUNE! / HOW ABOUT YOU? Join us for four Wednesdays (days of Mercury, Mercredi, ruler of Gemini,) in June as we celebrate Whitman by tearing his textual body apart like the hot Osiris he is! And then we reassemble him and ourselves in our own writing. How can we re-map Manhattan and Brooklyn through a Whitmanic gaze? Will Uncle Walt turn us queer? We certainly hope so! For tis the season of Twins! Twins! And we shall thrive thorough it. If SONG OF MYSELF is the seed text for so much of what has flowered since, what kind of Venus flytraps can we cultivate now in this our hothouse planet of glass and gas. Poets to the Emergency Room!   

    Filip Marinovich is the author of ZERO READERSHIP, AND IF YOU DON'T GO CRAZY I'LL MEET YOU HERE TOMORROW, and the forthcoming WOLFMAN LIBRARIAN, all from Ugly Duckling Presse. He worked as librarian at The People's Library at Occupy Wall Street Zuccotti Park and as co-compiler of the OCCUPY WALL STREET POETRY ANTHOLOGY with Steven Boyer. In February 2013 he began to teach READING POETS BY SUN SIGN, an ongoing workshop at the intersection of poetry, astrology, and archetype study. 
  17. Mapping Reading: Wandering through Art Books
    Saturday, April 15, 4-6pm 

    Led by Jorge Munguía
    Ages: 14-18
    Limited capacity: 10 participants
    Email info@wendyssubway.com to register

    This workshop will explore different ways of freely approaching and interpreting art and poetry books. In collaboration and conversations with others, participants are asked to turn a book of their choosing into a collective map. We will experiment with different ways of mapping and representing ideas using landscape as a metaphor for the exercise. The resulting maps will become part of an internationally shared network of rotating shows and digital exhibitions for future readers. 

    Bring along a book you like or choose one from our collection! All other supplies will be provided.